Indie Author Spotlight: Robert Eggleton

Friday, June 30, 2017



Hello lovelies welcome to a feature I am going to have on La Jersey Chika Reads Indie Books that is called Indie Author Spotlight. Each month I will post an Indie Author Spotlight to help spread word about the works of the fantastic indie authors that are out there!


Today tenth installment and feature is Robert Eggleton author of Rarity from the Hollow



 Robert Eggleton




Author's Bio

Robert Eggleton has served as a children's advocate in an impoverished state for over forty years. Locally, he is best known for his nonfiction about children’s programs and issues, much of which was published by the West Virginia Supreme Court where he worked from1982 through 1997. Today, he is a retired children's psychotherapist from the mental health center in Charleston, West Virginia, where he specialized in helping victims cope with and overcome maltreatment and other mental health concerns. Rarity from the Hollow is his debut novel. Its release followed publication of three short Lacy Dawn Adventures in magazines. Author proceeds support the prevention of child maltreatment.



 Robert Eggleton Social Media Sites






Robert Eggleton Book


Rarity from the Hollow

By Robert Eggleton

Genre: Adult Literary Science Fiction

Publication Date: November 3, 2016






Purchase Link




Author Interview


Q. Describe your book in ten words or less.

A. An unlikely savior of the universe -- tragedy, comedy, and satire.


Q. What draws you to this genre.

A. I enjoy reading and writing literary fiction and within most genres. I'm not a big fan of pure escapist novels. I tend to look for the author's hidden metaphors -- meaning behind the superficial and that seems to detract from my enjoyment. So, when I write, my goal is to produce something that will be reflected upon after the last paragraph has been read. I also enjoy reading speculative fiction -- the what if? There are several what ifs in Rarity from the Hollow, but the one that was most fun to write was its political parody. What if some compelling force united extreme capitalism and socialism by a common cause --- saving the universe? While much of the focus of my story was on the prevention of child maltreatment, there are other analogies -- i.e. global warming. Rarity from the Hollow was the first, perhaps the only, science fiction adventure to specifically predict the rise of Donald Trump to political power -- parody with no political advocacy one side or any other. Readers find out how Lacy Dawn, the protagonist, convinced Mr. Rump (Bernie Sanders) to help talk Mr. Prump (Donald Trump) into saving the universe. The allegory includes pressing issues that are being debated today, including illegal immigration and the refuge crisis, an issue that several European commentators have compared to cockroach infestation; extreme capitalism / consumerism vs. domestic spending for social supports; sexual harassment…. Mr. Prump in my story was a projection of Donald Trump based on the TV show, The Apprentice. The counterpart, Mr. Rump, was based on my understanding of positions held by Bernie Sanders as I wrote the story. Part of the negotiations in the story occur in the only high rise on planet Shptiludrp (Shop Until You Drop), a giant shopping mall and the center of economic governance, now more easily identifiable as Trump Tower. The allegory was not addressed by ARC reviewers of the novel because so few people worldwide considered Donald Trump to be a serious political contender until the primary elections in the U.S. The political allegory in the novel is obvious now that Donald Trump has become a household name. In summary, I am drawn to literary speculative fiction because it is so much fun to write.


Q. Where do you get information or ideas for your book?

A. Much of Rarity from the Hollow is more real than not, and based upon over forty years of my experiences working as a children's advocate. I use Google for research, for example, on updated research on prevalence rates or correlates of child abuse. One interesting element of the story pertains to the ET assistance that helped cure Lacy Dawn's parents -- she begins the story as an eleven year old protagonist, a victim of maltreatment. Her father is a war damaged Vet suffering from PTSD, night terrors, and anger outbursts. Several book reviewers have complimented by imagination when writing the medical intervention element of the story. In reality, humans are living in a very exciting time when computerized diagnosis and intervention of mental health concerns is an emerging science. The fantastical means employed by the alien in my story to treat the parents were based on today’s medical reality. I’ve already mentioned that in the beginning of Rarity from the Hollow, Dwayne, the abusive father was a war damaged Vet experiencing anger outbursts and night terrors. The mother was a downtrodden victim of domestic violence who had lost hope of ever getting her G.E.D. or driver's license, or of protecting her daughter. Diagnosis and treatment of these concerns affecting the parents, as representative of many similarly situated, was based on emerging technologies presented at the 2015 World Medical Innovation Forum: https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/ . Yes, in real life, like in my story, patients have been hooked up to computer technology for medial diagnosis and treatment. Additional exciting research was presented at that Forum and may one day may revolutionize psychiatric treatment. Most relevant to my story were: (1) smart brain prosthetics, wireless devises being tested for potential to relieve depression, PTSD, Bipolar Disorder…neural engineering to manipulate brain signals; (2) sophisticated imaging systems that are minimally invasive to brain circuitry for diagnosis (3) and, healing the brain with neuromodulation and electroceuticals to treat depression and schizophrenia. http://hitconsultant.net/2015/04/30/tech-revolutionize-neurological-psychiatric-care/


Q. How do you select the names of your characters?

A. Typically, I pick names that fit a culture for stories. While I love fantasy, I've found long and unusual first names for characters annoying, thereby sometimes leading to head hopping as I've read the stories. I try to avoid this practice. For example, I recently read a short story involving sisters with unusual but very similar first names. I kept getting the characters mixed up, complicated by their similar voices. The subculture for Rarity from the Hollow is Appalachian, a place where the use of first and middle names is common when addressing the individual, such as Billy Bob, or Robert Thomas. Lacy Dawn was addressed by her first and middle name in the story as a show of love and respect, while the other characters were addressed by their first names only as a sign that their parents did not hold their existences in high regard. As a back story, when pregnant, Lacy Dawn's mother realized that she would not be able to give her daughter beautiful things in life, so she decided to give her a very beautiful name at birth.  


Q. List your top 5 favorite authors or books.

A. Gosh, this is an impossible to answer question. I'm a mood reader, so my favorite books at one time may be entirely different than at another time. Right now: Vonnegut’s anger in Breakfast of Champions helped me stay strong as a children’s advocate and as a writer, and how to experiment with my writing style. Watership Down by R. Adams was such a sweet adventure that some of this element just is a necessary ingredient of even the scariest or saddest story. Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams is probably on a lot of lists of favorite books. If I feel nostalgic, like now, Another Roadside Attraction by Tom Robbins pushed me into the wilder side of writing regardless of censorship with views on religion and other topics. Last, The Color Purple by Alice Walker remains a role model for using colloquialism to reach mainstream readers. 


Q. What book/s are you reading at present?

A. I'm going to have to pass on this question. I'm reading a second novel by an unknown author and am so disappointed that I don't want to name it. I respected her debut novel and expected this one to be even better. It isn't. When this one was posted on a blog for 99¢ I grabbed a Kindle version. Don't misunderstand. I don't subscribe to the Goodreads rating system based on whether I "liked" a novel or not. If I'm considering writing a review of a novel I would never let my personal taste control such an important task -- my likes are irrelevant to whether a book is great or awful -- so are my comfort zones -- irrelevant. So far, this book has holes in the plot, is so mainstream that it could have been written by a computer program, and was poorly edited. There seems to be no message, but I'm hopeful that the author some how pulls it all together in the last third of the novel. I don't need to like a novel to give it a good rating, but I do have to respect it. Did the story fulfill its mission? It this novel does improve you may see my review on Amazon or Goodreads and you will get my answer to your question if you notice. If the novel does not improve, I may just skip writing a review. The impact of reviews can be so powerful that I wouldn't want to influence the behavior of an author who, based on the debut, has potential but released on perhaps prematurely. If this author was well known, making lots of money, I would have no problem blasting this piece of crap that I'm reading.


Q. What's next for you? What are you working on now?

A. I've been stuck in self-promotion mode for so long that I've neglected the next Lacy Dawn Adventure -- Ivy. I've submitted a couple of short stories to magazines recently but no bites. It seems to me that many magazines either stick very close to the Young Adult genre or are so extreme that my writing seems to have a hard time fitting into content. I don't want to change what I write just to achieve publication, so I'm trying to explore other alternatives. I'm working on a satirical essay, and a couple of poems. One of my poems won first place in an international competition last year, so I have a little name recognition because of that. Ivy, full of metaphors and allegory, is the story of an alien invasion of Earth based in an almost forgotten town. I live in West Virginia, the U.S. state with the highest rate of heroin overdose deaths in the nation. My familiarity with what is happening to my neighbors because of addiction prompted me to ask: how far will a child go to save a parent from addiction? I hope to achieve a similar finding when answering this serious question as I did with Rarity from the Hollow: “…a hillbilly version of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, only instead of the earth being destroyed to make way for a hyperspace bypass, Lacy Dawn must…The author has managed to do what I would have thought impossible; taken serious subjects like poverty, ignorance, abuse, and written about them with tongue-in-cheek humor without trivializing them…Eggleton sucks you into the Hollow, dunks you in the creek, rolls you in the mud, and splays you in the sun to dry off. Tucked between the folds of humor are some profound observations on human nature and modern society that you have to read to appreciate…it’s a funny book that most sci-fi fans will thoroughly enjoy.” http://awesomeindies.net/ai-approved-review-of-rarity-from-the-holly-by-robert-eggleton/ I'll let you know when it is released.


Q.  What advice do you have for writers?

A. I don’t feel competent to give advice to other writers, but I will share a little common sense based on my observations of this marketplace. Don’t expect to be discovered overnight like you were Elvis singing on the front stoop of an apartment located in a low-income neighborhood. Before you publish, make sure that your work as been professionally edited, or as close to it as your finances will allow – not by a friend or anybody with whom you have a personal relationship. If published, to the extent possible, prevent generic one line reviews from being posted on Amazon – they always look like they were written by your friends and detract from other reviews that appear more legitimate. Commit to the long haul by keeping in mind that the majority of those entering the world of books stay there briefly and then drop out never to be heard from again. And, last, never buy a book review and don’t invest more than you can afford in anything. I’ve heard of aspiring authors placing themselves and their families at financial risk by becoming over-committed to a book that they had written. Hard work pays off, but working smart has better outcomes.   


Thank You So Much Robert Eggleton For Your Time & Interview.



R. Thank you for the opportunity to tell your readers a little about myself and my debut novel, Rarity from the Hollow.



No comments:

Post a Comment